Events/News

Community Events

view:  full / summary

[PSC-EJWG] Fantastic article on Puerto Rico by Naomi Klein and featuring Elizabeth Y'eampierre

Posted by Derick Centeno on March 26, 2018 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Message from President Centeno:


It is very long, and thorough, but there is a lot of good information, including references to Vieques.


Warning: this is a long article but it is totally worth reading every bit of it. It looks at disaster capitalism in PR and, moreover, the organization of Puerto Ricans to develop both renewable and decentralized energy and to advance agro-ecological farming to feed the people.

Please share!


https://theintercept.com/2018/03/20/puerto-rico-hurricane-maria-recovery/

Election of the New Board

Posted by Derick Centeno on March 26, 2018 at 4:00 AM Comments comments (0)

From President Centeno:


The following is the result of the NY Chapter Executive Board Election held on Saturday March 17, 2018 at the CUNY Hunter College El Centro office:

Zenaida Rodriguez, NY Chapter President

Sandra Rivera, 1st Vice President

Deborah Quinones, 2nd Vice President

Diane Rosario, Recording Secretary

Miriam Ortiz, Treasurer

Maria Roman, Delegate

Maria del Carmen Latimer, Delegate

Michelle Centeno, Proxy Delegate :}

We will have the new Executive Board sworn in at the Welcoming Reception Friday evening April 6th at the Port Morris Distillery. Congratulations to the new Executive Board!!


Citigroup Drove Puerto Rico Into Debt.

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 27, 2018 at 2:30 PM Comments comments (0)

The article by Kate Aronoff revealing Citigroup's role in compounding Puerto Rico's debt is compelling; read it here.

Federal Judge Torruella according to NiPL and Other Sources

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 27, 2018 at 1:35 PM Comments comments (0)

President Centeno received an email from NiPL which shared the following redacted information:


Judge Juan R. Torruella, of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston, has requested that a federal grand jury investigate if there is a criminal case against those responsible for the Puerto Rico government's monumental debt, "I request an investigation by a federal grand jury to determine if there are criminal cases against individuals and organizations inside and outside of Puerto Rico in relation to the economic crisis facing the country," Torruella said earlier this week during his participation in a conference celebrating the 120th anniversary of the birth of former island governor Luis Muñoz Marín. The federal judge said such an investigation is fundamental so that the same mistakes that have led to the crisis are not committed again. He alluded to the large sum of money that the government will receive for Puerto Rico's recovery after hurricanes Irma and Maria. "I'm afraid that if something fundamental is not done, well, with the things that have happened so far, we're going to repeat them," Torruella said. "And now that a lot of money is apparently coming, we are going to repeat them more quickly." Torruella proposed that the investigation be conducted by the federal prosecutor's office in Puerto Rico to establish criminal responsibilities on the part of those who have led the U.S. island territory into bankruptcy.


"We are here to rethink Puerto Rico, to reconsider what has happened in the past," the 84-year-old judge said. "That is why I am suggesting the matter of the grand jury." The jurist called attention to the unity of purpose on the part of Puerto Ricans to get out of the economic crisis that the island is experiencing. He also called attention to the "passivity" with which the island has accepted unequal treatment by the U.S. government, and called for mobilizing what he called "allies" in minority sectors in the mainland U.S. to denounce the violation of Puerto Rican civil rights.


"It is time for that passivity to end," Torruella said. "Our cause is just".



The above appears to have been extracted from page 3 of the 2.22.2018 issue of The San Juan Daily Star.


If you are interested in learning more of the Judge Torruella's thinking, this interview reported by El Nuevo Dia is informative.


Lin-Manuel Miranda estrenará versión salsa de canción en beneficio de Puerto Rico

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 22, 2018 at 7:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Tocas aqui para mas detalles sobre este historía.

Supporting DACA

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 10, 2018 at 2:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Dear colleagues,

We want to share our latest Op-Ed piece, published today on The Hill, regarding our fight for a clean DREAM Act.


http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/politics/369634-dems-should-walk-from-any-deal-without-clean-dream-act


We invite you to read and share through your networks as we redouble our efforts on behalf of more than 800,000 brothers and sisters.

Un abrazo,


From:

Kenneth Romero-Cruz

Executive Director

National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators

http://www.nhcsl.org/

Taxing Puerto Rico to Death by Nelson A. Denis

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 10, 2018 at 10:05 AM Comments comments (0)

This link leads to an article by Nelson Denis which analyzes how Puerto Rico is penalized via the tax structure imposed upon it.

From the President of the Southern CA NACOPRW Chapter

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 10, 2018 at 8:05 AM Comments comments (0)

President Centeno wanted to share the following:


Date:  January 17, 2018

Dear NaCOPRW Members & Friends, Below is an email received from the NaCOPRW Southern California President.

Buenos dias,

I'm writing from Puerto Rico, where nothing I have encountered is business as usual!

While I'm definitely for tradition and leadership development, and support all of the topics members want at the convention, it strikes me as impossible to not do these in light of our current situation in Puerto Rico and the diaspora. What better purpose for leadership development and grant writing can we name than to do so to help our communities during this unfortunate period in our history? In my view everything we do as an organization needs to be framed by the urgency of shelter, food, water, education and health services being experienced in and out of Puerto Rico.


All of our communities throughout the country are being affected by the present situation. As a national organization, we can't turn a blind eye to the desperate need for a national agenda to support our community as per our mission and vision.


The conditions that I have witnessed over the last two weeks have solidified my commitment to helping the schools, that still remain in peril of closure by a Secretary of Education who is interested in privatizing schools, like the disaster they created in New Orleans after Katrina. Many have no materials and some schools have no roofs for the teachers and children to have a safe learning environment.


Women, the elderly, and children whose homes were destroyed are still homeless. Half if the residents are still living without electricity. My own sister in Bayamon has lost over 30 pounds living under conditions where she has to cook in a small camping stove outside.


The metropolitan areas are just beginning to find a sense of normalcy, and the brown waters running more clearly, and mountains are starting to bloom in a beautiful green again. The broken roads, bridges and electrical posts are coming up slowly, but it will take years for Puerto Rico to fully recover.


I don't think we can put post-Maria into a little box and contain it into one workshop. It's presence should underline everything we do for the next few years as an organization that was formed for the purpose of and committed to our national origin and our people.


Anaida


From the President of the Southern CA NACOPRW Chapter

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 10, 2018 at 8:05 AM Comments comments (0)

President Centeno wanted to share the following:


Date:  January 17, 2018

Dear NaCOPRW Members & Friends, Below is an email received from the NaCOPRW Southern California President.

Buenos dias,

I'm writing from Puerto Rico, where nothing I have encountered is business as usual!

While I'm definitely for tradition and leadership development, and support all of the topics members want at the convention, it strikes me as impossible to not do these in light of our current situation in Puerto Rico and the diaspora. What better purpose for leadership development and grant writing can we name than to do so to help our communities during this unfortunate period in our history? In my view everything we do as an organization needs to be framed by the urgency of shelter, food, water, education and health services being experienced in and out of Puerto Rico.

All of our communities throughout the country are being affected by the present situation. As a national organization, we can't turn a blind eye to the desperate need for a national agenda to support our community as per our mission and vision.

The conditions that I have witnessed over the last two weeks have solidified my commitment to helping the schools, that still remain in peril of closure by a Secretary of Education who is interested in privatizing schools, like the disaster they created in New Orleans after Katrina. Many have no materials and some schools have no roofs for the teachers and children to have a safe learning environment.

Women, the elderly, and children whose homes were destroyed are still homeless. Half if the residents are still living without electricity. My own sister in Bayamon has lost over 30 pounds living under conditions where she has to cook in a small camping stove outside.

The metropolitan areas are just beginning to find a sense of normalcy, and the brown waters running more clearly, and mountains are starting to bloom in a beautiful green again. The broken roads, bridges and electrical posts are coming up slowly, but it will take years for Puerto Rico to fully recover.

I don't think we can put post-Maria into a little box and contain it into one workshop. It's presence should underline everything we do for the next few years as an organization that was formed for the purpose of and committed to our national origin and our people.

Anaida


From the President of the Southern CA NACOPRW Chapter

Posted by Derick Centeno on February 10, 2018 at 7:55 AM Comments comments (0)

President Centeno wanted to share this message with you.


Date: January 17, 2018

Dear NaCOPRW Members & Friends, below is an email received from the NaCOPRW Southern California President.

Buenos dias,

I'm writing from Puerto Rico, where nothing I have encountered is business as usual!

While I'm definitely for tradition and leadership development, and support all of the topics members want at the convention, it strikes me as impossible to not do these in light of our current situation in Puerto Rico and the diaspora. What better purpose for leadership development and grant writing can we name than to do so to help our communities during this unfortunate period in our history? In my view everything we do as an organization needs to be framed by the urgency of shelter, food, water, education and health services being experienced in and out of Puerto Rico.

 

All of our communities throughout the country are being affected by the present situation. As a national organization, we can't turn a blind eye to the desperate need for a national agenda to support our community as per our mission and vision.

 

The conditions that I have witnessed over the last two weeks have solidified my commitment to helping the schools, that still remain in peril of closure by a Secretary of Education who is interested in privatizing schools, like the disaster they created in New Orleans after Katrina. Many have no materials and some schools have no roofs for the teachers and children to have a safe learning environment.

 

Women, the elderly, and children whose homes were destroyed are still homeless. Half if the residents are still living without electricity. My own sister in Bayamon has lost over 30 pounds living under conditions where she has to cook in a small camping stove outside.

 

The metropolitan areas are just beginning to find a sense of normalcy, and the brown waters running more clearly, and mountains are starting to bloom in a beautiful green again. The broken roads, bridges and electrical posts are coming up slowly, but it will take years for Puerto Rico to fully recover.

 

I don't think we can put post-Maria into a little box and contain it into one workshop. It's presence should underline everything we do for the next few years as an organization that was formed for the purpose of and committed to our national origin and our people.

 

Anaida

 




Rss_feed